How is potassium argon dating used dating a man 7 years younger

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Potassium-argon or K-Ar dating is a geochronological method used in many geoscience disciplines.

It is based on measuring the products of the radioactive decay of potassium (K), which is a common element found in materials such as micas, clay minerals, tephra and evaporites.

Time since recrystallization is calculated by measuring the ratio of the amount of 40Ar accumulated to the amount of 40K remaining.

The long half-life of 40K allows the method to be used to calculate the absolute age of samples older than a few thousand years.

Potassium is a common element found in many materials, such as micas, clay minerals, tephra, and evaporites.

In these materials, the decay product 40Ar is able to escape the liquid (molten) rock, but starts to accumulate when the rock solidifies (recrystallises).

Argon is an inert, colorless and odorless element — one of the Noble gases.

Used in fluorescent lights and in welding, this element gets its name from the Greek word for "lazy," an homage to how little it reacts to form compounds.

If one of these protons is hit by a beta particle, it can be converted into a neutron.

With 18 protons and 22 neutrons, the atom has become Argon-40 (Ar-40), an inert gas.

For every 100 K-40 atoms that decay, 11 become Ar-40.

Although researchers have determined the ages of rocks from other planetary bodies, the actual experiments—like analyzing meteorites and moon rocks—have always been done on Earth.

Now, for the first time, researchers have successfully determined the age of a Martian rock—with experiments performed on Mars.

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